Texts

Ming. Emperors, Artists and Merchants in Ancient China

In the West, Ming China is mostly known for its porcelain vases which have been highly valued for their exquisite beauty and quality for the past five hundred years. The exhibition of the Amsterdam’s Nieuwe kerk greatly broadens the above view: we are introduced a wide range of Ming art objects; silk paintings, calligraphy, furniture, jewellery, porcelain objects as well as erotic paintings. A further merit of the show is that it places the exhibits in a broad socio-historical context and refers to the emerging global trade which foreshadowed the modern world economy and China’s present-day economic dominance. Exhibition review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, V:4 (2013)
Ming. Emperors, Artists and Merchants in Ancient China

Peter the Great. An inspired tzar

The changes that Peter the Great brought about were enormous and swept through Russia like a sudden storm – changing everything from economy and social structure to army and navy, education and life-style… It is still debated if the strong kick of Peter’s reforms really produced a long-lasting momentum. Certainly, Russia needed another emperor for consolidating the changes, which she got in the person of Catherine the Great, some seventy years later. However, one thing is sure: under Peter the Great Russia became an international power, a position that she has maintained ever since.  Exhibition review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, V:3 (2013)
Peter the Great. An inspired tzar

Leiden Pearls

Review based upon the special exhibition held at the Museum De Lakenhal in Leiden, where the choreographer Karin Post combined dance, visual arts, literature and natural history into one wonderful display.  Art review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, V:1 (2013)
Leiden Pearls

The Road to van Eyck

Jan Van Eyck seemed, in the eyes of later generations, to light up suddenly as a supernova, his unique genius turning the art of painting and setting profoundly new standards of beauty. Was it really so? Is he really an inventor without forbearers or, can we root his oeuvre within his time? The exhibition of the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen seeks to answer this question by bringing together some ninety artworks which were created around the time of Jan van Eyck’s birth.  Exhibition review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, IV:4 (2012)
The Road to van Eyck

Rubens, Van Dyck & Jordaens. Flemish Painters from the Hermitage

  A nice selection of 17th century Flemish art, displaying 75 paintings and 40 drawings, most of them from the acquisitions of Catherine the Great. The exhibition had a special focus on Peter Paul Rubens who was represented by 17 paintings and many drawings.   Exhibition review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, IV:2 (2012)
Rubens, Van Dyck & Jordaens. Flemish Painters from the Hermitage

Taming an Artwork

An approach to modern art, based on Jean Tinguely’s creation: Le Golem.  Art review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, III:4 (2011)
Taming an Artwork

Splendour and Glory: Art of the Russian Orthodox Church

“…Icons are not paintings in the traditional sense. They are not aimed to entertain and only in some measure to confer religious ideas. Icons are gateways, channels for prayer through which believers can connect to the archetype or event depicted on them. They are sacred, and are miraculous by nature…” Exhibition review. Published in J. Eurasian Studies, III:2 (2011)
Splendour and Glory: Art of the Russian Orthodox Church